SMG Faculty Win “That’s Interesting!” Award at AIB 2013

SMG faculty Jasper Hotho and Dana Minbaeva won the Aalto University School of Economics “That’s Interesting!” Award at the AIB conference in Istanbul last week.

The Aalto University School of Business “That’s Interesting!” Award recognizes the AIB conference paper that most effectively pushes the boundaries of our existing knowledge in the field.

The award has been named after Murray S. Davis’ seminal article about how to define what is interesting in social sciences (Davis, M.S. 1971. That’s interesting! Towards a phenomenology of sociology and sociology of phenomenology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences, 1: 309-344).

The 2013 selection committee consisted of Elizabeth L. Rose (University of Otago and Aalto University School of Business), D. Eleanor Westney (Schulich School of Business, York University), and Udo Zander (Stockholm School of Economics).

The abstract of the award receiving paper is below. The full version of the paper is availbale from the AIB 2013 Conference Proceedings or by request to dm.smg@cbs.dk

HANDLING PRESSURES OF COMMUNITY LOGIC: THE IMPACT OF CLAN TIES ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION IN KAZAKHSTAN

Jasper Hotho*, Dana Minbaeva*, Maral Muratbekova-Touron** and Larissa Rabbiosi*
* Copenhagen Business School
** ESCP Europe – Paris

The paper aims at investigating how in pluralistic societies, such as emerging economies and countries in transition, organizational decision-makers respond to pressures of community logics in non-community settings, such as the work place. We theorize that in non-community settings, social relations and interactions with community members can act as social cues that induce and expose individuals to community logics. We subsequently propose that properties of these relations – immediacy and relatedness – will affect individual response strategies towards community logics. We test these ideas with an experimental vignette study of the effects of clan and kinship ties on recruitment and selection decisions in Kazakhstan, followed by qualitative interviews.

Jasper and Dana